Reunion: A NovelReunion by Hannah Pittard
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Review copy provided by LibraryThing Early Reviewer’s Program

From the publisher:

Five minutes before her flight is set to take off, Kate Pulaski, failed screenwriter and newly-failed wife, learns that her estranged father killed himself. More shocked than saddened by the news, she reluctantly gives in to her older siblings’ request that she join them–and her many half-siblings, and most of her father’s five former wives–in Atlanta, their birthplace, for a final farewell.

Written with huge heart and bracing wit, REUNION takes place over the following four days, as family secrets are revealed, personal deceits are uncovered, and Kate–an inveterate liar looking for a way to come clean–slowly begins to acknowledge the overwhelming similarities between herself and the man she never thought she’d claim as an influence, much less a father.

I didn’t really like Pittard’s debut novel, The Fates Will Find Their Way, but to be honest when I saw this book I only recognized the name of the author and couldn’t remember why. Upon finishing Reunion, I realized who the author was and my reaction to this read overall made perfect sense. I definitely liked this one better than her first novel, but it still wasn’t a home run for me.

What I did like about this book were the intricate, completely dysfunctional, family dynamics at play. I’m not sure you can even consider everyone in this book “family” – three ex-wives, one current wife, and their children – basically five separate families all came together for this one guy’s funeral. There’s obviously going to jealousy and tension and all kinds of crazy emotions, and Pittard got those aspects of the book so, so right. Also, the core group is Kate and her older siblings, Elliot and Nell, and, as I usually enjoy reading about siblings, really liked the dynamic of the three of them. Each one is deeply flawed individually, but they each in their own way aim to make one another better – and although they certainly don’t succeed every time, there is a current of unconditional love running through their bond. Basically, they are all the “real” family the three of them have, so they value that family above just about everything else.

Unfortunately, I didn’t like Kate at all – I found her spoiled, selfish, and completely out of touch with how her actions affected those around her. Her brother and sister were slightly better, but still – these people had been seriously scarred by their father’s behavior and by events from their childhoods. While I often can enjoy a book with characters I don’t like, in this case I found that difficult. Also I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the ending – while some loose ends were wrapped up, and some relationships ended up in a better place than they began, I still didn’t see much character growth happening. Kate still seemed selfish and shallow when the book ended, and that was frustrating for me.

But I do like Pittard’s writing, and I think she takes ordinary situations and adds a creative edge to them that makes her work more interesting than most. I’m still up for whatever she’s got next, with an open mind, because her concepts are so unique, although Reunion was just good for me – not great.