Landline by Rainbow Rowell

LandlineLandline by Rainbow Rowell
Published by St. Martin’s Press

From the publisher:

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply — but that almost seems beside the point now.

Maybe that was always beside the point.

Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her — Neal is always a little upset with Georgie — but she doesn’t expect for him to pack up the kids and go home without her.

When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.

That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts . . .

Is that what she’s supposed to do?

Or would Georgie and Neal be better off if their marriage never happened

Don’t you hate it when you read a book by a favorite author and the book isn’t OMG AMAZING like you think all of that author’s books should be? Well … this was the case for me with Landline. What’s annoying is that I feel like if another author had written this same book I might have thought more highly of it … but since I have such high expectations for Rowell, it fell a little flat for me.

The main issue I had with the novel is that I plain didn’t like Neal, and I didn’t see the love between the two of them at all, not once in the entire novel. Even when Rowell is showing the reader the younger Neal, the Neal Georgie fell in love with all those years ago, I didn’t get it. He was just … there … and I don’t know if maybe Georgie liked that about him, that he was the polar opposite of Seth, the polar opposite of the kinds of people she worked with and was friends with and maybe had been with in the past, or what, but I personally didn’t get it.

The things that Rowell excels at are still here, though, for the most part. Smart, zippy dialogue. A main character that doesn’t have it all figured out but is certainly trying (while my feeling for Neal weren’t great, I LOVED Georgie). Family dynamics that are complicated, interesting, and funny. I did like a lot of elements of the book, truly I did. I just think, overall, it wasn’t quite up to her usual standards.

I loved how the book ended, though. Regardless of my feelings about Neal, he’s still the one Georgie chose to marry all those years ago, and ultimately I feel like the book was her coming to terms with the fact that marriage is a choice, you choose to be with someone every day, and she actually decided in the end to make a real choice about her marriage and her life. I felt like she finally understood that she couldn’t just sit back and let life happen to her, she couldn’t just hope that she and Neal would work out, that she had to actively work on her marriage and herself if she wanted to be happy. I feel like that’s the message here and it’s a good, very important one. So good on you, Rowell, for that.

Overall, Landline is my least favorite of Rowell’s novels but still one to consider. And I think I would have liked it more if my expectations weren’t so darn high. Oh well.

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6 thoughts on “Landline by Rainbow Rowell

  1. I didn’t love this book either. I thought Neal was a whiner. (Hey, if your spouse earns the living, you have to suck it up when their job requires things you don’t necessarily like. And really? Running off and refusing to take her calls and canoodling with the ex-girlfriend?) I didn’t really like Georgie either. I did like the side characters…her sister and her mom. It seemed like Rowell was under a deadline or something here.

  2. I worried I wasn’t going to like Neal, but I ended up liking him quite a bit. One of my favorite parts of the book was when Georgie remembers that Neal doesn’t laugh because something’s funny; he laughs because he’s happy. Something about that realization on her part about the person she’d known and loved for so long was really touching to me.

    That said, I don’t think Landline lived up to how awesome Eleanor & Park and Fangirl were. But you can’t win ’em all!

  3. I picked this up at a book signing and read 70 pages while there but haven’t had time to pick it up again yet. I was really enjoying it but haven’t gotten to know Neal that well yet so we’ll see how that goes when I get back to it.

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