These two books have almost nothing in common except for two things: 1. I felt similarly “meh” about them both and 2. they were both review copies from Netgalley. So, why not talk about them in the same post?

Skinnygirl SolutionsSkinnygirl Solutions by Bethenny Frankel
Published by Touchstone, an imprint of Simon & Schuster
Review copy provided by NetGalley

You guys know by now that I’m a huge Bethenny Frankel fan, right? In fact, her talk show starts this week, and you can bet your ass I’m┬áDVRing that thing every day. Her newest book is packed full of advice on health (working out and eating properly), home and organizing, family, fashion, travelling, relationships, career, and lots of other stuff. While I found a few gems that I wouldn’t have thought of otherwise, overall most of what I read in this book are things I’ve heard before. I would say the most valuable pieces of advice come in the business/career section, as Bethenny has proven to be a very successful businesswoman and it’s because she really is smart and has great instincts, so the advice she shares in that department has definite value. The book does come with Bethenny’s trademark wit and sarcasm, so there were moments where I was cracking up laughing throughout reading the book, but overall this wasn’t one of my favorites. I would recommend it to die-hard Bethenny fans, but that’s about it.

Until She Comes HomeUntil She Comes Home by Lori Roy
Published by Dutton Adult, an imprint of Penguin
Review copy provided by NetGalley

I liked but did not love Roy’s first novel, Bent Road. Roy returns to Detroit and the Civil Rights movement in her newest novel, which is really about the various women that live in a particular neighborhood, dealing with all the regular struggles of life, with the additional fact that a local girl has gone missing. I think what annoyed me about this book was that it is SO similar to Roy’s first novel. Missing girl, messed-up family situations, black/white dynamics … the only difference (to me) was that Until She Comes Home was set in Detroit, while Bent Road was set on a farm, the family having recently left Detroit. What I did like was Roy’s writing, which is something I loved in her first book. It’s hauntingly quiet but very descriptive. I felt like I knew these characters, just from the way Roy wrote them and created their lives in such a fully realized way. Ultimately, I would like very much for Roy to write a different story than this, and if her next book is something completely different, I’d be willing to pick it up. But if I hear about this same kind of story a third time, I’d definitely pass on it.

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