I’m supremely excited to announce that I’ll be joining the Women Unbound Challenge.  This challenge really has my name written all over it, so I’m thinking I’ll read a ton of books related to women’s studies in 2010 and be very happy about doing so.🙂  I plan on participating as a Suffragete, which is reading at least eight books, three being nonfiction.  Truthfully I hope to read at least twenty between fiction and nonfiction that would qualify for this challenge.

Here’s the start-of-challenge meme:

1. What does feminism mean to you? Does it have to do with the work sphere? The social sphere? How you dress? How you act?

“Feminism is the radical notion that women are people” – this quote, by Charis Kramarae, has always been my go-to quote about feminism.  It really sums up my feelings on the subject.  Feminism is nothing more than stating the obvious fact that women deserve equal treatment to men.  I think feminism has to do with everything … not allowing men to receive favoritism in the workplace, sticking up for oneself in conversations about one’s opinions and such, dressing in a way that speaks to one’s personality, etc.  Feminism is a lot of things, but I think the biggest aspect of feminism is just having confidence in yourself and just being genuine.  The only way for women to earn respect and be seen as equals is to deserve it, to be intelligent and honest and all these things that it’s taken for granted men are.  That certainly isn’t going to fix every issue, but in terms of my personal life, I think it’s a start.

2. Do you consider yourself a feminist? Why or why not?

I definitely consider myself a feminist, because I believe that all people are equal, no matter what.  That means that women and girls should absolutely not ever, in any aspect, be treated as lesser beings than men and boys.

3. What do you consider the biggest obstacle women face in the world today? Has that obstacle changed over time, or does it basically remain the same?

I think there are many, many obstacles for women and it’s difficult to name just one.  I would say that one of the biggest issues I see is that around the globe, women’s health is not a priority in almost any way, for almost any country.  For a woman, having access to safe health care is so crucial to so many aspects of her life, and in so many countries women do not have the ability to make any decisions for themselves about their healthcare.  There are a million reasons why this is the case, and I won’t get into all of that now, but there are definitely things that can be done around the world to improve this situation.  In some parts of the world, this has improved over time, but even here in the United States there are several states where women and girls don’t have the ability to make choices about their own bodies.  So we have a long way to go on this.

I’m SUPER excited about this challenge, as you can see, thinking about and talking about feminism really jazzes me up so I’m hoping I’ll get a chance to read lots of interesting books that are women-focused.